TRIBES AND CULTURE: THE IGBOMINA YORUBA RACE (In Kwara and Osun state) 1.

A statue of Orangun with the Ogbo.

BRIEF HISTORY OF IGBOMINA
The Igbomina or Igbonna is a distinct dialectal unit of the Yoruba race. The term ‘Igbomina’ or ‘Igbonna’ refers to the people and the land they occupy. They occupy the Northern part of the Yoruba geographic map.

Geographical location.
The Igbomina land is bounded on the North-West by Ilorin; on the South by the Ijesa, on the South-East by the Ekiti, on the East by the Yagba, and on the North by the non-Yoruba Nupe region South of the Niger River. Igbomina is bounded on the West by minor neighbouring communities: Ibolo, Offa, Oyan and Okuku in the West. Geographically, Igbominaland lies between longitude 40E and 60E and Latitude 80N and 90N.
Dominance.

The Igbominaland touches two Yoruba states in Nigeria (Kwara and Osun). It covers three Local Government areas (LGAs) in Kwara State: Irepodun, Ifelodun and Isin LGAs. In Osun, it touches two Local Government areas: Ila and Ifedayo LGAs. Igbomina is an epic traditional conglomeration. This commanding dominance is what is raising internal agitations by the indigenes of this community for a new state to be carved out of Kwara and Osun state.

If the eighteenth century Yoruba-Nupe raids and the nineteenth century Yoruba wars did not affect them and their art and culture, perhaps Igbomina would have produced more diversified forms. Owing to the effects of the wars which resulted in the inter-mingling of people, the original Igbomina have been highly diluted.

Hence the Igbomina of today have been synthesized into what it is now; from fragments of all part of Yoruba land. Some of the people who fled from Ijesha, Oyo and Ekiti land as a result of the wars came to settle and made Igbomina land their homes (Babalola 1998). Also a considerable number of people who were Fulanis and Hausas in Origin who first settled in Ilorin later migrated into Igbominaland.
Historical origin.

The Name “Igbomina” or “Igbonna” is coined from “Ogbo mi mo na” or “Ogbo mo na” which means “My Ogbo -sword- tells directions”. According to the myth, ‘Ogbo’ is a traditional cutlass with a magical power that can tell directions: a power similar to the kind of which the pilots and sailors use today (compass) in determining their route.
It was handed by Oduduwa (the ancient Yoruba ancestor) to his son, Fagbamila Ajagunnla Orangun Ile-Ila (the founder of Igbomina land). Just like every other son of the Progenitor, Fagbamila was also sent out of ile-ife in search of a new threshold. Igbomina was the result of his epic voyage.

However, history has it that Fagbamila left Ile-ife already with a beaded crown. He wore this beaded crown for more than seventy years even during the life time of Oduduwa making him the only son of the ancestor to do so.

Oduduwa gave Fagbamila Ajagunnla, his son, the ‘Ogbo’ mystical pathfinder to aid his search stressing that it would lead the young prince through and to a suitable place to settle down. Fagbamila also used it to clear bush path along his way as he proceeds in the forest.
He moved North and eventually conquered. He settled finally in a vast stretch of land which today stretches across two state boundaries namely Osun and Kwara states. The Kingdom today is known as ‘Igbomina’ named after Orangun Fagbamila’s mystical pathfinder with the administrative house in Ila (in today’s Osun state).

Therefore, it will be safe to say that Igbomina are direct descendants of Oduduwa. Their forefather, Orangun (Oran-mi-gun) Fagbamila Ajagunnla, was the second male child of Oduduwa.

map of igbomina

In the moderb traditional setting, there are now fairly well defined states governed by different monarchs. Read more in the second section here… https://muzzammilwrites.com/2017/05/02/tribes-and-culture-the-igbomina-yoruba-race-in-kwara-and-osun-states-2/

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