TRIBES AND CULTURE: THE ANCIENT CITY OF KEFFI (NASARAWA STATE).

Sitting at the central part of Nigeria (Nasarawa State to be precise) and populated with about 85,919 inhabitants, Keffi is a beautiful town founded in the 1800 by Abdu Zanga (Abdullahi), a Fulani warrior from the north. Keffi is located just west of a junction of local roads that gives it quick access to Abuja and Nasarawa Toto. On the east, it connects the trunk highway at Akwanga, and the main railway at Lafia. It is apparently a center of connects.

Map of Nigeria.

History Of Keffi.

Based on research and archive studies, the early history of the though bigger Nasarawa province is not effectively documented. Facts can only be garnered from references to legends and oral literatures.

As far back as the 18th century or beyond, various movement and settlements into the (Nasarawa) province had happened already. Although, these movement cannot be so traced with lucid certainty. But at about the rising of 19th century, during the the era of the Fulani invasion, it was recorded that the Northern axis of ten province was raided by the Fulani and Habe (now in present day Abuja).

Hence; their settlement and dominance in the province. This invasion did not stop at the Northern axis but went southwards till Benue and even Idah kingdoms. Of course the Fulani invasion never stopped, until the arrival and bailings of the British colonial government; first through the Royal Niger Company and then later Fredrick Lugard’s establishment.

Lugard had this to say about the Nasarawa province in 1902:

‘… in the Nasarawa country, a once fertile and populous province, one can now only, view the remains and ruins of the large and totally deserted towns, bearing witness to the desolating wrought by 100 years of internecine strife and slave-raiding by the Fulani’.

Before the end of the (Fulani) administrative dominance, 5 Muslim kingdoms/ Emirate have already been established and keffi was one of them. The Emirates include:

  • 1802 A.D Keffi circa (originally Katsina Fulani)
  • 1804 A.D Abuja (originally Habe, kingdom of Zozo)
  • 1804 A.D Lafia Beriberi circa (originally Bornuese)
  • 1811 A.D Jemaan Darroro (originally cattle Fulani trunkajur)
  • 1835 A.D Nasarawa (originally of the keffi Fulani).

Only but a few other tribes (within the province) were not subdued by the raging Fulani dynasty and were able to maintain their resistance even up till the arrival of the British rule. Mada, Nungu, and Mama tribes (very close to the Bauchi Plateau) and some more are amongst the independent tribes.

As always, trust Muzzammilwrites to bring you scoops of all other tribes as mentioned above. Stay glued.

The Keffi Emirate (1802 A.D).

At the beginning of the nineteenth century, Fulani herdsmen who had annually brought their herds to graze in the dry season on the rolling grass country of which the central portion of Nasarawa Province consists, were encouraged to settle

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COMPULSORY PUPILAGE FOR YOUNG LAWYERS: AN ENVISAGED CURSE OR REMEDY? – – Ola-lawal Muazu

The uproar that the ‘to be law’ issue has generated is no longer news. More novel is the fact that lawyers to be will compulsorily have to take an extra 2 year pupilage course after graduating law school. According to the National Assembly, it proves to be a strategy for fresh lawyers to garner experience and curb ‘quackism’. But the aspiring lawyers for whom these bill is made are not happy about it.

Many have seen it as a delay in the process of achieving their goal on time, while some believe it just too ridiculous and pathetic since the one year law school programme was designed to after for this. However, some appear to be quite okay with it after all.

Well, Maybe the concept of pupilage was misconstrued by these fellows; maybe the there is more to it than what we are told. However, my opinion about the whole thing is succinctly analyzed below:

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TRIBES AND CULTURE: THE BADAGRY PEOPLE OF LAGOS.

Background of the People of Badagry.

Traditionally referred to as Gbagle, Badagry is a coastal town and local government area (LGA) in Lagos State, Nigeria. It is situated between the city of Lagos, and the border with Benin at Seme.

The name Badagry was culled from the means of livelihood of the indigenes of the city which include fishing, farming, salt making. Others believe the city got its name from ‘Agbadarigi’—a farm owned by a popular farmer of that time, Agbedeh. The farm was one of the reasons Europeans explored. Agbadarigi would later be rephrased for easy pronunciation by the Europeans to ‘Badagry’.

In the early eighteen century Badagry serve as a route for the Europeans where slaves were transported to new destination of their buyers. It homes the cenotaph –‘Point of No Return’ stream. The well at this place was enchanted to ensure slaves that drink from it forget their source.

At the end of eighteen century, Badagry was one of the routes that benefited from the recurrent battle between Portnovo and Dahomey for the movement of slave. Badagry was noted as the auction point for slaves captured during inter-villages warfare.

Badagry is a monarchy headed by the Wheno Aholuship, a kingship head by the Akran of Badagry and his seven white cap high chiefs. The white cap chiefs administer the eight quarters into which Badagry is divided, they include Ahovikoh, Boekoh, Jegba, Posukoh, Awhanjigo, Asago, Whalako and Ganho. These quarters and the families that ruled them played prominent roles in brokering slave trade with the Europeans and Brazilians.

History of the People of Badagry.

Founded in the early 15th century on a lagoon off the Gulf of Guinea, its protected harbour led to the town becoming a key port in the export of slaves to the Americas, which were mainly to Salvador, Bahia in Brazil. It was also such a big departure point for slaves headed for French Saint-Domingue, today’s Haiti, that a main God of Haiti’s Official Religion of Vodun is called Ogun-Badagri.

The settlement in Ketu, present-day Benin Republic (formerly known as Dahomey), might be an appropriate starting point for a brief history of the Gbe-speaking peoples. In Ketu, the ancestors of the Gbe-speaking peoples separated themselves from other refugees and began to establish their own identity.

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NYSC ORIENTATION EXERCISE: THINGS TO TAKE TO CAMP.

Are you a prospective NYSC corp member? And you are probably thinking about what you need and what not you need to take along to the Orientation camp. Well, worry no more as this post covers and reveals all you need to know about NYSC and its orientation exercise.

The NYSC Orientation exercise is a three-weeks program set up to:

(a) to give the corps members a better understanding of the objectives of the NYSC scheme and enable them to internalize its ideals.

(b) To familiarize corps members with their new environment in their political, cultural, social and economic setting.

(c) To instil discipline in the youths; and

(d) To imbue in them the spirit of collective responsibility.

Thus: It means you would be needing some important items to be equipped. It is advised you create a hand list of them for easy purchase. Below are the basic items and some other necessaries for the orientations course.

Basic items:

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Ethics and Conduct: The Youth Vs The Elders in the 21st Century — Baruwa Yusuf.

The society has changed and old things passed away. It is the modern century of technological beef up. The engagements of today seems to be far more productive than then. We now have our information saved on clouds; We don’t need to bother our brains any longer. Indeed, the advancement in technology has made our lives easy, flexible and splendid. Unarguably, we are now smarter than our predecessors.

However, could the same story be said of our moral affairs too? I mean: Since the standard level of reasoning has evolved over time, shouldn’t the level of mannerism and behaviour also follow suit?

Whenever I hear some set of people accuse other set of not having manner, I personally begin to wonder if the meaning of the word “manner” has followed a neo-logical process. Although the word seems polysemous, its pragmatic meaning should however be stated. Let us know who is right and who is deceiving who.

I am practically beginning to get confused as to which divide to stand. A relative situation is where someone from the younger generation tries to correct or disapprove a detrimental step or advice from an elder, not judging the consequences or circumstance, the young man is quick to be labelled a ‘rebel with absence or no manners’. Even if it appears that the decision may affect him adversely in the nearest future. If that is what is called ‘lack of manner’, then the real meaning of manners need to be established.

According to the late Afro beat legend, Fela Anikulapo Kuti, the kind of dogmatic followership expected of us from our elders was described as ‘ZOMBIE’. And be it as it may, I am sorry; I was not bred to be a zombie. I will speak my mind with reasons for you to believe. Am meant to be somebody like my mum would say.

Our elders are our bosses at work, teachers in school, our parents at home and even the leaders in our politics ruling over us. They have always nurtured the notion that: we have no right to object whatever decree they made. Sometimes, I wonder if they still perceive this generation as a weak one. For the record, we have come of age. The 18th century is different from the 21st. Slave trade was abolished long time ago.

I am sorry, if my lips cannot be pierced like lock hinges to deprive me of my freedom of speech and I can not be handcuffed to be refrained from writing my mind. This is the 21st century.

Moreover, in as much as I refuse to be caged in the box, I know our elders possess some level of temerity, wisdom with a sackful of life experience. They are meant to guide our steps and not command our steps. It is not enough to toy with our success. We are the leaders of today: We rule our world.

In conclusion, as a well cultured Yoruba boy, I pledge not to insult or abuse anyone most especially the elders as it will be against the teachings of Omoluabi -the Yoruba teachings on good character. One of which says “Emi lóri rere ti kò níwà, ìwà ló máa borì re je” effectively translated to English by Adeyemi (2008:120) as ‘as good as a person’s destiny may be, if he has no character, it is lack of character that will ruin his destiny’. Well, I also pledge to always speak or write out my raw mind.

Written by Comr. Baruwa Yusuf.

Edited and Posted on Muzzammilwrites.

14-10-2017

WORLD MENTAL HEALTH DAY: BE YOUR BROTHER’S KEEPER.

As an annual tradition, on this date (10-10-2017), the world marks a special moment to drum support for the mentally challenged individuals. This also includes awareness campaign to raise hope of treatment and survival for the victims. The World Mental Health Day is a smart Initiative of the United Nations (UN) in collaboration with the WHO.

This year’s theme of the World Mental Health Day aims basically at ‘Focusing on Conducive Work Environment’. Apart from its effect at tackling the mental health challenges, it also has potentials address the extent of the poor orderliness the world faces today. Corruption as one of the reference; Indeed, the brains need be properly reminded.

Nigeria’s situation is more precarious. Ours is a country of ‘one day one trouble’. The worries of many Nigerians are many. That is why the mental illness cases are everywhere around us and no one seems to be appreciating the nexus between the two.

However, Psychological experts have established a sharp connection between depression and mental challenges. Thus, those who are acutely depressed could actually slip off to ‘mental derangement’ If not properly detected.

Now what is depression?

Depression is a major depressive order: a serious medical illness that negatively affects how one feels, thinks and act. Depression is capable of causing feelings of sadness or even loss of interest in a particular activity one once enjoyed. Although it is a treatable illness, various emotional and physical problems are attached to it.

Individuals carry depressions everywhere around us without being noticed. Let’s begin from the work place: where a worker who earns peanuts (18,000 minimum wage for instance) is in the position to feed a family of 7 and above. I mean no one would be happy in such condition knowing fully well that he has to ‘bread-win’ his family on debts and alms. A clear indication of how your take home can’t take you home.

A worker that operates in a hostile environment is

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NIGERIA @ 57: BRING BACK THE MAMMOTH By Comr. Okhifo Oscar.

Happy Independence to Nigeria at 57! Yes, though we have been through downs together, it would have been an apogee to excuse myself from the celebration. Of course, we are in this together; we must all participate in the brainstorming to overcome.

I eloquently share in the view of some about the hastiness of our colonial freedom. They have, over the years, insisted that the independence of 1960 was too much in a hurry. For their arguments, they believed the colonial masters should have tarried a little longer. Perhaps, a similar development like the one in South Africa would have been the light.

As obvious, the level of infrastructural development and education would have been less abysmal. Unlike what we have at the present; Our self-rule struggle hadnt fetched us enough qualities like those years. As a matter of fact, there are communities where the only surviving means of formal education are the schools that were built by either the colonial influence or the missionaries.

Those who have had the mandate to lead such people simply refused to add up to what they grew up to meet. Such comatose has loudened the cry of pain. A society with an homegrown authorities but lack the basic needs for survival. What a dismal.

The elites of those times, aided by their subjects, worked together

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