NIGERIA @ 57: BRING BACK THE MAMMOTH By Comr. Okhifo Oscar.

Happy Independence to Nigeria at 57! Yes, though we have been through downs together, it would have been an apogee to excuse myself from the celebration. Of course, we are in this together; we must all participate in the brainstorming to overcome.

I eloquently share in the view of some about the hastiness of our colonial freedom. They have, over the years, insisted that the independence of 1960 was too much in a hurry. For their arguments, they believed the colonial masters should have tarried a little longer. Perhaps, a similar development like the one in South Africa would have been the light.

As obvious, the level of infrastructural development and education would have been less abysmal. Unlike what we have at the present; Our self-rule struggle hadnt fetched us enough qualities like those years. As a matter of fact, there are communities where the only surviving means of formal education are the schools that were built by either the colonial influence or the missionaries.

Those who have had the mandate to lead such people simply refused to add up to what they grew up to meet. Such comatose has loudened the cry of pain. A society with an homegrown authorities but lack the basic needs for survival. What a dismal.

The elites of those times, aided by their subjects, worked together

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INDEPENDENCE DAY SPECIALS: THE CHRONICLES OF THE BRITISH EXPEDITIONS IN NIGERIA [I].

In 1862, shortly after the abolition of slave trade off the Atlantic coast of Lagos and after gaining full dominance, in the order that they wade off potential hijackers (French and Portuguese Government), the British administration employed the use of force and guns on the Lagoon. This move eventually compelled the then King of Lagos: Oba Dosunmu to ceding his kingdom to the British.

THE YORUBA EXPEDITION: How the Yoruba region was captured.

By the treaty (of ceding) signed by the King, it meant that the Queen (from London) shall then control and administer the Port and Island of Lagos with all rights, profits and territories so as to assist, defend and protect the people of Lagos. This was the beginning of official colonialisation in the coast.

Although, the King (Oba Dosunmu) alongside his dynastic rival, Kosoko was rewarded with a pension scheme of £1030/year, he

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