TRIBES AND CULTURE: THE BADAGRY PEOPLE OF LAGOS.

Background of the People of Badagry.

Traditionally referred to as Gbagle, Badagry is a coastal town and local government area (LGA) in Lagos State, Nigeria. It is situated between the city of Lagos, and the border with Benin at Seme.

The name Badagry was culled from the means of livelihood of the indigenes of the city which include fishing, farming, salt making. Others believe the city got its name from ‘Agbadarigi’—a farm owned by a popular farmer of that time, Agbedeh. The farm was one of the reasons Europeans explored. Agbadarigi would later be rephrased for easy pronunciation by the Europeans to ‘Badagry’.

In the early eighteen century Badagry serve as a route for the Europeans where slaves were transported to new destination of their buyers. It homes the cenotaph –‘Point of No Return’ stream. The well at this place was enchanted to ensure slaves that drink from it forget their source.

At the end of eighteen century, Badagry was one of the routes that benefited from the recurrent battle between Portnovo and Dahomey for the movement of slave. Badagry was noted as the auction point for slaves captured during inter-villages warfare.

Badagry is a monarchy headed by the Wheno Aholuship, a kingship head by the Akran of Badagry and his seven white cap high chiefs. The white cap chiefs administer the eight quarters into which Badagry is divided, they include Ahovikoh, Boekoh, Jegba, Posukoh, Awhanjigo, Asago, Whalako and Ganho. These quarters and the families that ruled them played prominent roles in brokering slave trade with the Europeans and Brazilians.

History of the People of Badagry.

Founded in the early 15th century on a lagoon off the Gulf of Guinea, its protected harbour led to the town becoming a key port in the export of slaves to the Americas, which were mainly to Salvador, Bahia in Brazil. It was also such a big departure point for slaves headed for French Saint-Domingue, today’s Haiti, that a main God of Haiti’s Official Religion of Vodun is called Ogun-Badagri.

The settlement in Ketu, present-day Benin Republic (formerly known as Dahomey), might be an appropriate starting point for a brief history of the Gbe-speaking peoples. In Ketu, the ancestors of the Gbe-speaking peoples separated themselves from other refugees and began to establish their own identity.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Ethics and Conduct: The Youth Vs The Elders in the 21st Century — Baruwa Yusuf.

The society has changed and old things passed away. It is the modern century of technological beef up. The engagements of today seems to be far more productive than then. We now have our information saved on clouds; We don’t need to bother our brains any longer. Indeed, the advancement in technology has made our lives easy, flexible and splendid. Unarguably, we are now smarter than our predecessors.

However, could the same story be said of our moral affairs too? I mean: Since the standard level of reasoning has evolved over time, shouldn’t the level of mannerism and behaviour also follow suit?

Whenever I hear some set of people accuse other set of not having manner, I personally begin to wonder if the meaning of the word “manner” has followed a neo-logical process. Although the word seems polysemous, its pragmatic meaning should however be stated. Let us know who is right and who is deceiving who.

I am practically beginning to get confused as to which divide to stand. A relative situation is where someone from the younger generation tries to correct or disapprove a detrimental step or advice from an elder, not judging the consequences or circumstance, the young man is quick to be labelled a ‘rebel with absence or no manners’. Even if it appears that the decision may affect him adversely in the nearest future. If that is what is called ‘lack of manner’, then the real meaning of manners need to be established.

According to the late Afro beat legend, Fela Anikulapo Kuti, the kind of dogmatic followership expected of us from our elders was described as ‘ZOMBIE’. And be it as it may, I am sorry; I was not bred to be a zombie. I will speak my mind with reasons for you to believe. Am meant to be somebody like my mum would say.

Our elders are our bosses at work, teachers in school, our parents at home and even the leaders in our politics ruling over us. They have always nurtured the notion that: we have no right to object whatever decree they made. Sometimes, I wonder if they still perceive this generation as a weak one. For the record, we have come of age. The 18th century is different from the 21st. Slave trade was abolished long time ago.

I am sorry, if my lips cannot be pierced like lock hinges to deprive me of my freedom of speech and I can not be handcuffed to be refrained from writing my mind. This is the 21st century.

Moreover, in as much as I refuse to be caged in the box, I know our elders possess some level of temerity, wisdom with a sackful of life experience. They are meant to guide our steps and not command our steps. It is not enough to toy with our success. We are the leaders of today: We rule our world.

In conclusion, as a well cultured Yoruba boy, I pledge not to insult or abuse anyone most especially the elders as it will be against the teachings of Omoluabi -the Yoruba teachings on good character. One of which says “Emi lóri rere ti kò níwà, ìwà ló máa borì re je” effectively translated to English by Adeyemi (2008:120) as ‘as good as a person’s destiny may be, if he has no character, it is lack of character that will ruin his destiny’. Well, I also pledge to always speak or write out my raw mind.

Written by Comr. Baruwa Yusuf.

Edited and Posted on Muzzammilwrites.

14-10-2017

INDEPENDENCE DAY SPECIALS: THE CHRONICLES OF THE BRITISH EXPEDITIONS IN NIGERIA [I].

In 1862, shortly after the abolition of slave trade off the Atlantic coast of Lagos and after gaining full dominance, in the order that they wade off potential hijackers (French and Portuguese Government), the British administration employed the use of force and guns on the Lagoon. This move eventually compelled the then King of Lagos: Oba Dosunmu to ceding his kingdom to the British.

THE YORUBA EXPEDITION: How the Yoruba region was captured.

By the treaty (of ceding) signed by the King, it meant that the Queen (from London) shall then control and administer the Port and Island of Lagos with all rights, profits and territories so as to assist, defend and protect the people of Lagos. This was the beginning of official colonialisation in the coast.

Although, the King (Oba Dosunmu) alongside his dynastic rival, Kosoko was rewarded with a pension scheme of £1030/year, he

Continue reading

CALL FOR UNITY: NATIONISM VS NATIONALISM IN NIGERIA.

PhotoGrid_1501609727874
A Cross Representation of the Major tribes/ethnics in Nigeria

Justifiably, the creation work of the british administration in this part of the sub Saharan Africa over a century ago has not only suffered instability but also disunity. Nigeria has (and is still witnessing) series of events, actions and reactions. And like a seasoned movie, the end is not in sight.

These continual troubles have further raised issues and opinions as to whether the Fredrick Luggard’s hosted marriage was even a right bid. So far, the country is been torn apart by internal crisis, war, and hates speeches thereby threatening the nationhood.

Sir Hugh Clifford, the British colonial administrator and Governor General of Nigeria ( 1920 – 1931 ) after Fredrick Luggard, described Nigeria as “a collection of independent Native States, separated from one another by great distances , by differences of history and traditions and by ethnological, racial, tribal, political, social and religious barriers.” –Culled from James Smoot Coleman’s book, Nigeria (p. 194).

It is in this plight that this article wills to dig out solutions from the present ditch using sociolinguistics terms and some historical antecedents as it relates to the theme. The title has already given insights to the approach. First, we would understand the concepts of ‘Nationism and ‘Nationalism’. Then we forge ahead with other relevant concepts.

Nationism:
Nationism is the practical effort and services geared towards running and maintaining a nation. This means that, unlike the belief of some, nations are artificial creations. Therefore,

Continue reading

TRIBALISM AND IT’S EFFECTS ON NATIONHOOD.

tribalimages
No to Tribalism

Before you read further, ask yourself this questions:

–Who are You?
–Where do you hail from?

I would expect your response to the second question to carry FIRST your Nationality before giving necessary and unnecessary details of your tribe. If not, then I think you are part of the problem. Read further to see reasons.
Tribalism and nepotism (or ethnicity as you may which to call it) has been the canker-worm disturbing our vegetables of unity and, if not treated, can lead us through that path of disintegration. Sometime ago, the President (Muhammadu Buhari) asserted in one of his speeches that the oneness of this nation is Non negotiable. Well, I think the Nation, Nigeria, needs restructuring. But (anyways) that’s a topic for another day.

Whether or not we want to negotiate it, tribalism needs to be killed. Tribalism is a political anomaly. According to Wikipedia online encyclopedia, tribalism is a state of being organized in, or advocating for, a tribe or tribes. It is also seen as a behavioral defunct where people are more loyal to their tribes than to their friends, country or other social groups. Relating it to Nigeria (the most populous Black nation with a massive representation of tribes and language), it is of no doubt present. People are seen associating with and protecting their various ethnic groups in the political setting.

However, this concept isnt to strange to us. Instances of it can be traced to activities of our founding fathers even before the independence. We had the first crop of Continue reading