INDEPENDENCE DAY SPECIALS: THE CHRONICLE OF BRITISH EXPEDITIONS IN NIGERIA (II).

THE NIGER-DELTA/BIAFRA EXPEDITION: How the rest of the South was conquered.

Although Lagos was the first place the British conquered, it appeared that there was also a concomitant push going on in the South South of what is today called ‘Nigeria’ as at the same time when Lagos was been bombarded. The interference also came as an impact of the British military (Navy) presence in the Niger-Delta area.

Thus: in order to practically abolish slave trade, British warships patrolled the West African coastline in 1807. The military passed a Slave Trade Abolition Act but up until 1836, when they employed the use of real force, Bonny was still a great dealer in slave trade through the coast.

To stop them,the British Navy initiated a clean operation which of course met resistance from the then King of Bonny, Alali. Alali arrested the Captain of the British Warship (liet. Tyron) and his troop in a bid to counter react.

Apparently, the move didnt end well for the Bonny Camp. British relaunched a tougher operation into Bonny with more warships. At the longrun, Bonny had to surrender and was made to sign a treaty of ensuring the safety of European lives and property within the coast. Because Alali later flaunted the agreement in 1837, the British Military toppled his rulership and installed a new King: W.D Pepple, a native who was practically an ally to the Europeans. This laid a solid ground for the British to ride on.

The military then made use of the opportunity to

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